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Scabies in the Amhara region of northern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study of prevalence, determinants, clinical presentation and community knowledge

Library location : BMJ open

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Issue Date : 2023-10-25
Abstract :

BMJ Open. 2023 Oct 25;13(10):e075038. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2023-075038.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The WHO aims to prevent, eliminate or control neglected tropical diseases, including scabies, by 2030. However, limited epidemiological data presented a challenge to control efforts, especially in high burden countries. There was a major scabies outbreak in northern Ethiopia starting in 2015 and prevalence has since increased across much of the country.

OBJECTIVE: To estimate scabies prevalence, identify its predictors, and assess community perception of, and knowledge about, the infestation.

DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study.

STUDY SETTING: Ayu Guagusa district, Amhara region, northern Ethiopia.

PARTICIPANTS: 1437 people who were members of 381 randomly selected households participated in the study. Five trained mid-level health workers clinically diagnosed people with scabies.

OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinically diagnosed scabies infestation.

DATA ANALYSIS: Multi-level logistic regression models were fitted to adjust for individual and household-level confounding variables, and identify predictors of scabies infestation.

RESULTS: Scabies prevalence was 13.4% (95% CI 11.8 to 15.5). Households of more than five people (adjusted OR (aOR)=3.5, 95% CI 1.2 to 10.2) were associated with increased odds of developing scabies, however, females had lower odds (aOR=0.5 95% CI 0.3 to 0.8). Scabietic lesions most frequently involved the trunk (62.0%), and vesicles were the most common types of lesions (67.7%). Two-thirds of adult study participants had heard about scabies and most obtained scabies related information from informal sources. Only 32% of cases sought care for scabies from any source.

CONCLUSION: Scabies prevalence was high, signifying the need for community-based control interventions. Host density and sex were important predictors of scabies. Despite the favourable attitude toward the effectiveness of scabies treatment, healthcare seeking was low.

PMID:37880172 | PMC:PMC10603513 | DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2023-075038

Description :
CONCLUSION: Scabies prevalence was high, signifying the need for community-based control interventions. Host density and sex were important predictors of scabies. Despite the favourable attitude toward the effectiveness of scabies treatment, healthcare seeking was low.
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